Featured, Opera trivia

The Top 10 Operas of All Time, According to Regular People

From classic 16th-century works to new, modern productions revealed around the world, opera continues to build on its 400+ year repertoire. But which must-see operas do the majority of people say is the best? To help you decide which shows to cross off your opera bucket list, we’ve compiled the top 10 operas of all time, according to regular people.

Ranker—the leading media platform for crowd-sourced rankings on just about everything— has a pretty impressive list that shares just that. With over 47,000 votes and counting, check out the results from Ranker’s Best Operas of All Time below:

1. The Magic Flute

It’s no surprise to see The Magic Flute at the top of the list. Among one of the most performed operas in the nation, Mozart’s masterpiece is a fairy tale of an opera, featuring a love story, themes of good and evil, and a wicked, mysterious Queen of the Night. The vocal ranges required for singers in this production are challenging, even reaching a rare high F note. See the renowned and demanding aria sung by the Queen of the Night character in the clip above!

2. Rigoletto

Based on a French play, Giuseppe Verdi’s Rigoletto is a tragic story packed with emotion and drama. Set in 16th century Italy, Rigoletto follows the Duke of Mantua, his court jester Rigoletto, and Rigolett’s unlucky daughter. Love, murder and betrayal, Verdi hits it all in this iconic opera.

3. Don Giovanni

Don Giovanni is a young and arrogant aristocrat who will stop at nothing to challenge unrequited lust, even if it means violence. Another work of Mozart, Don Giovanni presents a thrilling story of lust, murder and revenge—it’s no wonder the production is such a popular one. Don Giovanni is also an opera that is often re-imagined through different lenses because of its unique adaptability. Whether it’s set at a college campus or inside the world of film noir, this timeless opera is a classic.

4. Carmen

Carmen, by French composer Georges Bizet, is easily one of the most popular operas in the world, boasting iconic arias (like Habanera in the clip above) and melodies that continue to lend themselves to everything from cartoons to commercials. Sung in French but set in Spain, Carmen follows a provocative gypsy and her love triangle, and features a shocking finale.

5. Le nozze di Figaro

Mozart’s Le nozze di Figaro (sometimes called The Marriage of Figaro) is the first truly comedic operas to make the list. This opera tells the story of a wedding gone wrong, complete with merry mix-ups, deception and missed connections all the way to the altar. Le nozze di Figaro is also where you can hear one of the most famous pieces of opera music—the overture—that continues to also make its way into popular culture, even today.

6. La traviata

Think Pretty Woman, but not funny. A heart-breaking masterpiece, La traviata can be found on many opera bucket lists because of its iconic music, likable characters, and its irresistible themes of true love. Another opera by Verdi, La traviata’s story is so beautiful and tragic, that it’s been adapted into many different forms, including Pretty Woman and Moulin Rouge. Plus, it just might boast the the best drinking song ever, as you can see for yourself in the clip above. Cross it off your list this season! 

7. Tosca

Another perfect opera tragedy, Tosca is the first Puccini opera we’ve encountered so far on our list. Sacrifice, death, power and love are all explored in this dark masterpiece of an opera. Recently referred to as the “original #MeToo opera,” Tosca tells the story of two people secretly in love, who are willing to risk it all at a chance of freedom together.

8. La bohème

La bohème is another Puccini opera about the lives of talented musicians, artists, poets and philosophers living in Paris. A group of friends emerge and begin to find family within one another, living as bohemians together. Loosely adapted into the popular musical and movie Rent, La boheme is a favorite among many.

9. Turandot

Puccini’s gorgeous Turandot takes place in China, and follows a story about a beautiful princess, Turandot, and the challenging—and risky—task she presents her suitors. Full of surprises, Turandot is an unconventional love story with a twist. Turandot also claims one of opera’s most powerful and iconic arias, Nessun Dorma, seen in the clip above.

10. The Barber of Seville

The only Rossini opera to make it in the top 10, The Barber of Seville is a comedic opera, based on a famous play by Beaumarchais. In a sort of Rapunzel situation, a young woman named Rosina is confined to her uncle’s home after the death of her parents leaves her with a fortune. Her uncle and guardian Bartolo forbids her to see any man—but this is an opera after all, and opera love knows no bounds.

We just included the top 10, but Ranker’s list goes on into the hundreds. What would be on your list? Let us know which opera you think should be number one in the comments!

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Madama Butterfly Becomes Miss Saigon
Featured, Opera history

Madama Butterfly Becomes Miss Saigon

If imitation is the highest form of flattery, then Giacomo Puccini should feel absolutely immersed in adulation from modern-day producers of musical plays. Some of the greatest hits of musical theater in recent decades have been remakes of his best-loved operas. (Who remembers Rent, a.k.a. La bohème ?)

The “remake” is not a new concept. Indeed, there is a certain amount of security in using old stories to create modernized versions of classic tales. This allows the artists to concentrate on the music, the sets, the costumes, and the overall production while piggybacking off of a beloved plot; time-tested to be a real crowd-pleaser.

So it would come as no surprise that people would be eager to borrow from arguably the most successful opera composer of all time to ensure the success of a Broadway-style musical.

The smash hit Miss Saigon is a musical based on Puccini’s opera Madama Butterfly, and recounts the tragic romance between an Asian woman and her American lover. The location was moved from pre-World War I Japan to 1970s Viet Nam, while the geisha becomes a bargirl, and the naval officer becomes a G.I. sergeant. Their love story remains unchanged—and just as heartbreaking.

However, Puccini is not the originator of the story, either. He based his work on a one-act play that he saw in London called, Madame Butterfly: A Tragedy of Japan, by David Belasco—which itself was based on a short story by John Luther Long. This, in turn, was based the 1887 French novel Madame Chrysanthème by Pierre Loti.

Therefore, more than just one remake, this particular story has been recycled and re-imagined through several versions and at least three languages over the course of a century. Still, it’s Puccini’s version that we all know and love the best.

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